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Ardingly Solar Car Project

The Ardingly Solar Car Team were the first in Europe to design, build and race a solar-powered vehicle 3,020km from Darwin to Adelaide across Australia in the 2015 Bridgestone World Solar Challenge. They entered the Cruiser class which looks at how solar-powered cars can become a practical mode of transport. To find out more about this extroadinary achievement click here

The new team of students are now working on a more sophisticated car and plan to race again in 2019. 

We have three teams working on the project:

  • The Mechanics Team iresponsible for designing and building our car. 
  • The Electronics Team whose main task was to design and programme the circuitry and systems needed for the car. 
  • The Business Team,  concerned with issues such as finance, sponsorship and promotion. 
  • Why do this from an educational point of view?
  • To equip our future engineers and scientists with the latest technology
  • To expose our students to the industrial and research worlds
  • To bring in-house new skills
  • To empower our students and to let them make informed career choices
  • To encourage product design and allow our students to have a route to develop products for the market place
  • To form a basis for ensuring that students keep links with Ardingly whilst in education and future careers.
  • To inspire our students to strive and have ambitious but achievable targets.
  • AND - to have fun whilst learning.

Solar Team 2017

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"Ardingly Solar’s undertaking is an excellent way for students to engage in an exciting area of new technology and it gives them an understanding of team work, engineering and running a business."  

David Smith Chief Financial Officer Rolls Royce

“Ardingly’s Solar Car project brings to mind the daring contribution of the scientists and engineers who created the manufacturing revolution that made Britain the world’s top industrial nation.”  

Rt Hon Francis Maude MP

“McLaren recognises that somewhere amongst such young people might be the next R J Mitchell or Kelly Johnson, the next Isambard Kingdom Brunel or Adrian Newey. Indeed, if the standard of engineering that I have seen on the Solar Car here today, and if the potential that I have witnessed in the students are anything to go by, perhaps the worthy successors to those incredible engineering icons will come from some of the students present today.”

Robert Tyers , McLaren Automotive